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12 Mar

Errata

Errata Concerning the article: Starrs, Bruno D. 2016. Self-censorship in Bruneian Literature and Journalism.  Aesthetique Journal for International Literary Enterprises (AJILE) 2 (1): 1-8.   The passage below (pp. 3-4), extracted from Starrs’ article, contains several errors—both factual and misleading:   "Un-redacted, fortunately, is t

22 Dec

Self-Censorship in Bruneian Literature and Journalism- Dr D Bruno Starrs

Self-Censorship in Bruneian Literature and Journalism Dr D. Bruno Starrs, Queensland University of Technology, Australia Abstract Brunei’s government is very active in censoring non-Islamic cultural artefacts, including English language literature. This paper examines two Bruneian novels, H. K. Lim’s Written in Black and Amir Falique’s The Forlorn Journey,