Top
Mutemelodist. –
fade
284
single,single-post,postid-284,single-format-standard,mkd-core-1.0,mkdf-social-login-1.0,mkdf-tours-1.0,voyage-ver-1.0,mkdf-smooth-scroll,mkdf-smooth-page-transitions,mkdf-ajax,mkdf-grid-1300,mkdf-blog-installed,mkdf-breadcrumbs-area-enabled,mkdf-header-standard,mkdf-sticky-header-on-scroll-up,mkdf-default-mobile-header,mkdf-sticky-up-mobile-header,mkdf-dropdown-default,mkdf-dark-header,mkdf-fullscreen-search,mkdf-fullscreen-search-with-bg-image,mkdf-search-fade,mkdf-side-menu-slide-with-content,mkdf-width-470,mkdf-medium-title-text,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.12,vc_responsive

21 Oct

Tragic Suffering

Tragic Suffering The tragic hero begins to suffer more and more acutely ever since the discovery. Suffering may take the form of death, but not always. Oedipus, for example, is not made to die at the end. With devastating irony, Sophocles brings on the stage a kingly figure who has blinded himself at the very moment when he achieved true vision. He accepts his guilt and plucks his eye

21 Oct

Tragic Flaw or Hamartia

Tragic Flaw or Hamartia The events are set in motion by a defect in the character of the tragic hero. If a wholly good character comes to a sad end, our moral sense is shocked. If a villain comes to an unhappy end, we are not moved. The tragic hero must be somewhere between these extremes. Such a man will be better than most men. But he has some sort of a tragic flaw. Aristotle does n

21 Oct

Recognition or Anagnorisis

Recognition or Anagnorisis Anagnorisis is the sudden discovery by which the character finally gains the essential knowledge they have lacked. It is often in the form of profound insight. It is the first step to self-knowledge. Oedipus gains a new kind of vision when he realizes that he himself is the guilty one he has been seeking. He comes to this self-knowledge through one of the se

21 Oct

Peripeteia/ Reversal of Fortune

Peripeteia/ Reversal of Fortune Aristotle finds that all tragedies follow a clearly defined pattern. The most important aspect of this pattern is what we call peripeteia. It means a change of fortune from good to bad. Since reversal is something opposite to what the character expects, it has always the effect of dramatic irony. “Oedipus is more sinned against than sinning.&rdquo

21 Oct

Elements of a Tragedy

Elements of a Tragedy Plot Reversal of fortune/ Peripeteia Recognition/ Anagnorisis Tragic flaw/ Hamartia Suffering Spiritual Regeneration Catharsis/ Purgation Tragic Vision Aristotle defines tragedy as: “Tragedy is an imitation of an action, that is serious, complete in itself and possessing a certain magnitude: in language that gives delight appropriate t

21 Oct

Verse Drama

Verse Drama Why should the dialogue of a play be done in verse? To find an answer we must go back to the very beginnings of drama. Greek drama evolved from song and it must have seemed only natural for a play to be in verse, especially if it was intended for a serious occasion. Moreover, the metrical form added open air declamation. The Elizabethans accepted the Greek tradition of ver